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The campaign so far

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The #fixfundraising campaign 

The #FixFundraising coalition and its supporters call on federal, state, and territory governments to implement a nationally-consistent, contemporary and fit-for-purpose charitable fundraising regime by:

  1. Passing amendments to the Australian Consumer Law to ensure its application to fundraising activities for and on behalf of charities (and other not-for-profit organisations) is clear and broad
  2. Repealing the existing fragmented State and ACT fundraising laws, and
  3. Working with Australian Consumer Law regulators, the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission, self-regulatory bodies and sector intermediaries to draft and consult publically on a core mandatory code to be enforced under the Australian Consumer Law multi-regulatory framework

Read the Joint Statement on Fundraising Reform:

Videos: explaining the problem and our solutions

We've produced some videos to help spread the word about our campaign to #fixfundraising. Check them out below:

Timeline: key moments in the campaign to #fixfundraising

2019

September: Hope for federal support

Zed Seselja, Assistant Minister for Finance, Charities and Electoral Matters, attended a forum hosted by the Governance Institute of Australia and listened to household name charities discuss the need to #fixfundraising.

August: Consumer Affairs Forum

State and territory consumer ministers miss an opportunity to discuss fundraising reform. Fundraising reform did not make it onto the agenda at the annual Consumer Affairs Forum meeting in New Zealand on 30 August.

Opposition charities spokesperson Andrew Leigh MP expressed disappointment that the coalition government hadn’t followed through with its election commitment.

May: All major parties have made an election commitment to #fixfundraising 

All major parties have committed to fixing Australia's fundraising laws as part of their election platform. 

With a stronger, simpler and smarter regime, Australia can build a modern fundraising system that works as well for donors as it does for our vital charities. Read more about each party's commitment, and about the full package of charity reforms that Labor has promised. 

April: Call for an election commitment to #fixfundraising 

It is well past time to #fixfundraising. Please join us in calling on each of the major parties to make an election commitment to reform the laws that apply to the fundraising activities of charities. We need this to be an election promise so we can hold them accountable. This needs to be a political priority. 

We seek a commitment from each of the major parties that, if elected in May 2019, the new government will:

  1. Within its first 30 days, commit to implementation of recommendation 25 from the Strengthening for Purpose: Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Legislative Review 2018 Report (that 'The Australian Consumer Law be amended to clarify its application to charitable and not-for-profit fundraising and a mandatory Code of Conduct be developed').
  2. Within its first 100 days, convene a meeting of all Ministers with responsibility for the Australian Consumer Law with the sole purpose of discussing amendments that would support better regulation of fundraising activities by and on behalf charities, including consideration of a core mandatory code.
  3. Support the repeal of existing fragmented State and ACT fundraising laws by ensuring the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission is enabled as the one-stop shop for relevant reporting and registration, including its ability to securely share data with State, Territory and Commonwealth regulators.

Read the full letters:

February: Report of the Senate Select Committee on Charity Fundraising in the 21st Century

The Select Committee on Charity Fundraising in the 21st Century was set up to inquire and report on the current framework of fundraising regulation for charities and options for reform (on 19 June 2018). We attended a hearing on 29 October 2019 and later submitted answers to questions that we had taken on notice.

The Commitee handed down its report on 14 February 2019. Read the #fixfundraising coalition's response to the report.

More than 95 submissions were made. Read the submissions

In our submission we made one recommendation:

That the Senate Select Committee on Charitable Fundraising in the 21st Century recommends the Federal Government actively support and assist with the development of a nationally-consistent, contemporary and fit-for-purpose charitable fundraising regime for implementation no later than mid-2019 by:

  • initiating (or at least supporting) amendments to the Australian Consumer Law to ensure its application to fundraising activities for and on behalf of charities (and other not-for-profit organisations) is clear and broad;
  • urging the repeal of existing fragmented State and ACT fundraising laws; and
  • working with other Australian Consumer Law regulators, the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission, self-regulatory bodies and sector intermediaries to draft and consult publically on a core mandatory code to be enforced under the Australian Consumer Law multi-regulatory framework.

Read our submission:

2018

Review of the ACNC legislation

The Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission review panel report was tabled in Parliament on 22 August 2018. It makes 30 recommendations aimed at finding a balance between supporting the sector, reducing red tape, enhancing accountability and addressing misconduct.  

Overall, in our view, it is a clear, sensible and well-written report that supports our campaign to #fixfundraising in Australia. It recommends that the Australian Consumer Law (ACL) be amended to clarify its application to charitable and not-for-profit fundraising and a mandatory Code of Conduct be developed to sit alongside the ACL. While it is music to our ears to have yet another independent report attest to what we, and many other organisations and peak bodies, have long been calling for, the time for action is now. Yet another welcome recommendation is that the exemption from financial reporting for basic religious charities (BRC) be reviewed. In our submission (in more detail below), we called for the removal of the concept of BRC, as it's not clear what special attributes BRC organisations have which justifies a lower level of regulatory oversight (no financial reporting or compliance with ACNC governance standards). We will be watching closely how Government responds to this recommendation.

We've put together a video unpacking some of the key recommendations in the 144-page report.

Watch the video here.

​You can read our full submission below:

Please read our supplementary submission below: 

2017

Review of the Australian Consumer Law

The campaign coincided with the reivew of the Australian Consumer Law. You can see our submissions here. The final report of the ACL Review was published on 19 April 2017. Access a copy of the report here. It confirmed that ‘in many cases the activities of fundraisers in seeking donations are captured by general provisions of the ACL’, however, there is a lack of guidance on the application of the ACL (to fundraising). The report noted the immediate need for such guidance and proposes it be developed as a priority project for 2017. The guidance has been published and you can access it here.

It also proposed that a project be undertaken to ‘assess the effectiveness of the guidance’ and that 'this project will look at how this could inform whether any future reforms are needed to enable the sector to work more effectively to the benefit of the Australian community'. After lobbying by the #fixfundraising campaign, Consumer Affairs ministers agreed the project commence in 2018-2019. We now await further news of the commencement of the project.

Note the final report also stated that ‘some parts of the sector also suggested that the ACL should be amended so that the generic protections in particular apply expressly to fundraising. It was said that this would provide the reassurance needed to help state and territory governments reform their local fundraising laws, potentially in conjunction with enhanced self-regulatory regimes. Some stakeholders had strong views that these local laws were inconsistent, not suited to cross-border activities, online activities and crowdsourcing, and hinder the work of the not-for-profit sector.' No further comment was provided on this suggestion.

The #fixfundraising campaign calls on the Prime Minister and other heads of government to fix our outdated fundraising regime 

On Wednesday 5 April 2017, the signatories* of the Joint Statement on Fundraising reform along with the Public Fundraising Regulatory Association (PFRA) and the Fundraising Institute of Australia (FIA) wrote an open letter to the Prime Minister and all heads of governments. The letter calls on governments to prioritise working together to fix fundraising so community organisations can get on with what they do best - building flourishing communities. The latest version of the letter, 29 August 2017, contains more than 190 signatories.

All of our fundraising reform submissions over the last ten years:

Submission to the Senate Select Inquiry into Charitable Fundraising in the 21st Centure (6 August 2018)

Submission to the Interim Report of the Australian Consumer Law (ACL) Review (9 December 2016)

Submission to the Productivity Commission Issues Paper: Consumer Law Enforcement and Administration (30 August 2016)

Submission to New South Wales Government “Charitable Fundraising Review, Discussion Paper (July 2016), including Charitable Fundraising Review Discussion Paper

Submission to the Australian Consumer Law (ACL) Review (27 May 2016)

Submission to Treasury, 'Re:Think, better tax, better Australia White Paper' (2015)

Submission to Treasury, ‘Charitable Fundraising Regulation Reform Discussion Paper’ (2012)

Submission to Victorian Competition and Efficiency Commission, 'Inquiry into Victoria's regulatory framework' (2010)

Submission to Productivity Commission, 'Contribution of the Not-for-profit Sector' (2009)

Submission to Senate Standing Committee on Economics, 'Inquiry into the Disclosure Regime for Charities and Not for-Profit Organisations' (2008) 

Last Updated: 10 August 2017

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